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Posts Tagged ‘Bicycle Boulevard’

(Ed Note: Most information on Bicycle Friendly Street treatments come from the Technical Design Handbook in the 2010 LA Bike Plan.  Though we are happy to present it in bite-sized pieces, we highly recommend you download it yourself and have a good read.  You can download the Technical Design Handbook here.  For a refresher on what a Bicycle Friendly Street is -also called a Bike Boulevard- you can read our introductory post here. You can also find previous posts on chicanes, round-a-bouts, loop detectors and other BFS treatments here

The LADOT Bike Blog hopes everyone had a nice Bike Week LA 2011. To commemorate this year’s  “Bike Friendly LA” theme, the LADOT Bike Blog continues its ongoing series detailing the specific treatments that go into making a Bicycle Friendly Street (BFS) – a big part of LA’s bicycle friendly future.

Today, we will take a look at the Traffic Control Device (TCD) known as signage. Signage is considered a “Level One” BFS application based on its relatively low level of physical intensity. It is important to note that BFS applications are site-specific, and that not all streets require the highest application treatments. The Bike Plan Technical Design Handbook (TDH) recommends gathering community input along with the necessary engineering and design work to determine the level of application necessary for each individual street.

CA MUTCD-approved signage

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The LADOT Bike Blog hasn’t done a full review of all the bike lane projects in the queue in quite a while. Sure, we covered the Woodman Avenue bike lanes and the latest on the Metro Orange Line extension bike path, but that hardly represents a comprehensive update.  At the April BPIT meeting, Planning and Bikeways engineering promised to provide a full update on all ongoing bike lane projects.

Well the wait is now over: LADOT Bike Blog is presenting a full update on all of our projects’ progress since our last update in January. As always, you can check out the full list of current projects on our Bike Lane Projects page, our Bike Path Projects page, our Projects map, and our BPIT map.  There’s also the matter of the remaining, and mysteriously named, “Year Zero” projects.  We’ll provide an explanation of what “Year Zero” is, and what projects are left, below the fold.  But first, the current projects update.

Woodman Bike Lane

New Bike Lanes on Woodman Avenue

Project Updates

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(Ed Note: Most of the information on Bicycle Friendly Street treatments in this post  comes  from the new Bike Plan’s Technical Design Handbook.  Though we are happy to present it in bite-sized pieces, we highly recommend you download it yourself and have a good read.  You can download the Technical Design Handbook here.  For a refresher on Bicycle Friendly Streets generally–read our introductory post here.)

An example of a chicane from Austin, TX

It’s time for yet another installment in our ongoing series that details the specific treatments that go into making a Bicycle Friendly Street (BFS). Today, we will examine chicanes – a traffic calming device. Traffic calming devices are considered “Level Four” BFS applications based on level of physical intensity. It is important to note that BFS applications are site-specific, and that not all streets require the highest application treatments. The Bike Plan Technical Design Handbook (TDH) recommends gathering community input along with the necessary engineering and design work to determine the level of application necessary for each individual street. In case you were wondering, there are five different application levels – varying from signage to traffic diversion. (more…)

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(Ed Note: Most of the information on Bicycle Friendly Street treatments in this post  comes  from the new Bike Plan’s Technical Design Handbook.  Though we are happy to present it in bite-sized pieces, we highly recommend you download it yourself and have a good read.  You can download the Technical Design Handbook here.  For a refresher on what a Bicycle Friendly Street is – you can read our introductory post here.)

2008 05 30 - 2064 - Bethesda - Glenwood RdIn our ongoing series explaining the elements of a Bicycle Friendly Street, today we will laud the virtues of the Mini Roundabout.  The mini-roundabout is related to the traffic circle, which was conceived in 1902 by William Phelps Eno (the “Father of Traffic Safety” and designer of Columbia Circle). The terms tend to get lumped together often and can lead to some confusion. However, in a roundabout:

  • Yield Control is used at all entries (no stop signs).
  • Circulating vehicles have the right-of-way.
  • Pedestrian access is allowed only at the legs of the roundabout, behind the yield line.
  • All vehicles circulate counter-clockwise and pass to the right of the central island.
  • Deflection is built into the design in order to slow down motor vehicles upon entry into the roundabout.

The roundabouts being described in this post have a single lane surrounding a raised island in the center of an intersection (they can also be multi-lane). They range in price from $100,000 to $750,000 for installation and are considered to be a Level 5 treatment, which is the highest level of treatment provided for in the 2010 LA Bike Plan‘s Technical Design Handbook (TDH). (more…)

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It was a festival atmosphere at City Hall this morning as bicyclists from all over the City pedaled in to celebrate a new era for Los Angeles. As we’re sure you’ve heard, the Draft LA Bike Plan is “draft” no longer; the Bike Plan came before City Council yesterday and was unanimously adopted into the City’s General Plan.  Today was the celebration.  Check out all our photos from today on flickr or our facebook page.

LA Bike Plan Celebration 007

The hoopla just getting started

When looking for reports on yesterday’s Council meeting, you can take your pick: the LADOT Bike Program Facebook Page, the BikeBlogChris Twitter feed, Streetsblog, Biking in LA, Good, LA Times, LA Now(twice), KPCC, Flying Pigeon, LACBC, CorbaMTB, the Daily Bruin, NBC4, ABC7, KCET, Venice Patch, Mar Vista Patch, LA Weekly, the Daily News, LAist, The Washington Post, The Contra Costa Times, and many, many others.

This morning, a gathering of City staff, elected officials, and the bike community came together to celebrate the new bike plan and reflect on what its adoption means for the City of Los Angeles. (more…)

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(Ed. Note: The draft LA Bike Plan passed through committee this past Wednesday.  We hope to have notes up from the meeting in the next few days.  In the meantime you can read the excellent coverage provided by Streetsblog, as well as twitter blow-by-blows by BikeBlogChris and the #LABikePlan hashtag.)

First off, let’s cover the most important information:

  • The Bike Plan Implementation Team (BPIT) will meet on the first Tuesday of every month.  It is held at 2PM in City Hall, room 721 (in the City Planning Department’s offices)
  • These meetings are 100% open to the public
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Which bike lanes get built first? It's up to you.

With that out of the way, let’s talk about what the BPIT is, what they do, why they’re important, how you can contribute, and what they’ve done so far.

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On a date consisting of five consecutive 1’s (1/11/11), the Planning Subcommittee of the Bicycle Advisory Committee met with LADOT Bike Program Coordinators, LADOT Bikeways Engineers, and City Planning staff to hash out details and progress for a number of projects.  If this post tickles your fancy, the BAC Bikeways Subcommittee is meeting tomorrow from 1:00-3:00.  You can read their full agenda and RSVP here.

If subcommittees just aren’t your thing, you can attend the full Bicycle Advisory Committee bi-monthly meeting on Tuesday, February 1st.  They meet at 7:00 at Hollywood City Hall, 6501 Fountain Ave.

 

The full BAC in August, courtesy Biking in LA

In a wide-ranging meeting, the BAC Planning Subcommittee covered:

  • The newest updates to the LA Bike Plan;
  • Progress on the Expo Bikeways;
  • NBC/Universal’s planned expansion;
  • Bikeways along the Crenshaw LRT line, and;
  • Creating a demonstration project which will fully engage a community before, during, and after construction of a bicycle facility.

In attendance from LADOT were Michelle Mowery, Nate Baird, Christopher Kidd, Tina Backstrom, Tim Fremaux, and Paul Meshkin.  From City Planning was Jordann Turner.  From the BAC were Kent Strumpell, Glenn Bailey, Jonathan Weiss, Jeff Jacobberger, Jay Slater, and Larry Hoffman.

Follow below the fold to get all the juicy details.

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